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Can you tell me anything about this old petroleum company…and its stock certificate I recently found in an attic? Am I rich?

America’s first oil company – the Pennsylvania Rock Oil Company of New York.

Unfortunately, this small historical society cannot grant requests for free research regarding individual company histories and the potential value of stock certificates. As you may have discovered, financial research is difficult and time consuming. If you are fortunate, a visitor to this website or a society volunteer may have posted helpful information.

Also, remember that this small, nonprofit society needs your 100-percent tax deductible financial support. Please make a donation!

If it is not here, and to share further research experiences, you are invited to submit your query in the current Stock Certificate Q&A Forum.

LATEST RESEARCH POSTINGS

Below is research submitted by a leading volunteer of the American Oil & Gas Historical Society. The company histories presented often tell fascinating stories – and are exclusive of the Stock Certificate Q&A forum posts also on this website. Check back here for more of these rare histories.

Updated April11, 2014

Admiral Oil Company
Aetna Petroleum Corporation
Ajax Oil Company
Alaska Dakota Development Company, Inc.
Aladin Oil & Refining Company
Allied Oil Corporation
American Controlled Oilfields
American Indian Oil & Gas Company
American Leduc Petroleum
American Workers Oil Field Company
Anchorage Gas & Oil Development, Inc.
Anglo-American Oil Company
Arkansas Oil Ventures
Black Hills Petroleum Company
Buck Run Oil and Refining Company
Buffalo-Texas Oil Company
California Oil & Gas Company
Capitol Petroleum Company
Cauble Oil Company
Centralized Oil & Gas Company
Chieftain Royalties, Inc.
Cities Service Company
Conejo Hills Oil
Congressional Oil Corporation
Corpus-Burk Oil Company
Craven Oil & Refining Company
Double Standard Oil & Gas Company
Doughboy Oil Company
Dysart Oil Company
Eureka Oil Company
Evangeline Oil Company
Federal Oil and Gas Company
Fort Stockton Oil Company
Galloway Oil Corporation
Gas, Oil and Developing Company (The)
Gladys City Oil, Gas & Manufacturing Company
Gladys Oil Company
Golden Gate Oil Company
Golden Goose Oil and Refining Company
Golden Valley Oil & Gas Company
Great Southwestern Petroleum Company
Great Western Oil & Gas Company
Hale Petroleum Company
Higgins Wonder Oil Company
Hiram Wilson Oil Company
Hoffman Oil & Refining Corporation
Holly Oil Company
Horseshoe-Western Oil Company
Iowa-Beaumont Oil Company
Julian Petroleum Corporation
Kokernot Oil Company
Lewis Oil Corporation
Lincoln-Idaho Oil Company
Lincoln Oil Producing Company
Lucky Jim Oil Company
Lucky Long Oil Company
McKeesport Gas Company
Midfields Oil Company
Mid-Texas Petroleum Company
Milwaukee Electra Oil Company
Montrose Gas, Oil and Coal Company
Mountain States Resources Corporation
National Oil Refining and Manufacturing Company
National Union Oil & Gas Company
New Mexico Oil Properties Association
North Counties Oil Company
Oil Exploration International
Old Colony Oil Company
Overland Oil Incorporated
Palmer Union Oil Company
Pelican Petroleum Company
Petroleum Maatschappij Salt Creek Company
Petroleum Producers’ Association
Petroleum Production Company of America
Phenix Oil and Gas Company
Pongratz Petroleum Company
Postal Employees Oil & Gas Company
Price River Petroleum Company
Producers and Refiners Corporation
Provident Oil & Refining Company
Prudential Oil and Refining Company
Quick Development Syndicate
Ranger Petroleum Company
Revere Oil Company
Richfield Oil Corporation
Ruby Hill Oil & Gas Company
Ryan Petroleum Corporation
Sable Oil & Gas Company
Sammies Oil Corporation (Choate Oil)
Santa Fe Dome Oil Company
Sawyer Petroleum Company
Sawyer-Adecor International
Seaboard Oil & Gas Company
Security Oil Company
Shoshone Oil Company
Signal Oil and Gas Company
Sound Cities Gas & Oil Company
Southwest Oil Corporation
Southwestern Oil Development Company
Spear Oil Company
Staveless Barrel & Tank Company
Tapo Oil Company
Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation
Texas Oil & Refining Company
Texas Oil Products Company
Texas Producers Oil Company
Texas Production Company
Texas-Rotan Oil Company
Texas United Oil Company
Tulsa Producing and Refining Company
Union Oil, Gas & Refining Company
Wellington Oil Company of Delaware
Woman’s Federal Oil Company of America
Women’s National Oil & Development Company
Wyoming Peerless Oil Company
Yankee Girl Oil Company

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Admiral Oil Company

Aetna Petroleum Corporation

Ajax Oil Company

Ajax Oil Company left behind a curious history. It was organized by members of the Sowell family in Dallas, Texas as a Joint Stock Association on July 25, 1919. The company capitalized at $4,950,000 and offered both Class A and Class B shares.

Ajax Oil Company acquired leases in Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana including some in the famous Burkburnett and Ranger oilfields. Among its properties were 11 producing wells and the equipment to drill more. Class A shares “had preference as to assets as well as dividends” and beginning in September 1919, shareholders were paid dividends of one percent per month for seven consecutive months. The company’s stock sold for about $5 per share as the company brought in both oil and natural gas wells, often in association with the Hercules Petroleum Company and Halleck-Whales.

Dividends abruptly ended in March 1920 and shareholders were advised that the company was investing in new equipment to expand operations. In August, a Mr. B. A. Butterworth sued Ajax Oil Company for debts. It is unclear what happened next, but by December of the following year, Ajax Oil Company was bankrupt and in receivership.

Aladin Oil & Refining Company

Alaska Dakota Development Company, Inc

In 1959, New York Attorney General Carl Madonick noted that with securities fraud, the first big step was creation of a national market price via fictitious quotations and phony transactions to convince potential investors of a company’s legitimacy. Madonick cited Alaska Dakota Development by way of illustration.

“We had one a few weeks ago involving a Los Angeles promoter of the stock of Alaska Dakota Development Company, Inc. The promoters induced New York brokers to list fictitious quotations on the stock which then appeared in a publication of the National Daily Quotation Service. Stock was supplied to a securities firm in Denver which in turn supplied stock to two firms in New York. A market was made to appear for the stock at the prices quoted – which of course was all the salesmen needed.”

Hannibal Associates, Inc. authored and perpetuated the fraud until the Securities and Exchange Commission revoked Hannibal’s license in March of 1960. Newspaper columnist Sylvia Porter reported on Alaska Dakota Development in two headlined columns: “How Racketeers Sell Worthless Stock” and “Hoods Move On Wall Street.” Stock certificates from Alaska Dakota Development Company have only collectible value.

Allied Oil Corporation

American Controlled Oilfields

American Indian Oil & Gas Company

American Leduc Petroleum

Lowell Birrell, president of American Leduc Petroleum, was a fugitive in Brazil for several years while avoiding prosecution by the Securities and Exchange Commission. “In the three years after Birrell became president of American Leduc in 1954, the company issued six million new shares of common stock, which Birrell then sold illegally, using a boiler-room telephone and mail campaign run by a New York brokerage firm, J. A. Winston & Company,” SEC prosecutor Arthur L. Liman later explained.

American Leduc’s actual production of oil in Cuba was minimal; the company had no earnings, and its prospects were doubtful to say the least. For a time the fraud was spectacularly successful. In one year, from August 1955 to August 1956, Birrell and J. A. Winston sold three and a half million shares of American Leduc at an average price of $1.05. Three months later, the price dropped to about fifty cents a share.

By July 1961, “the stock was trading for about eight cents a share and was overpriced at that.” With an indictment returned on July 20, 1951, Birrell and his co-conspirators faced a possible sentence of 55 years and a $60,000 fine. They were found guilty, but government ultimately dismissed the case. The stock has collectible value only.

American Workers Oil Field Company

The American Workers Oil Field Company was underwritten by about 6,000 shipyard workers on the coast of Washington (Bremerton, circa 1919) and acquired 2,000 acres in Wyoming, encompassing areas of the Lost Soldier Field extending to Casper.

The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission may offer more information. Read more about Wyoming’s petroleum history in “Petroleum Pioneers of Wyoming.”

Anchorage Gas & Oil Development, Inc.

George Tucker and Ralph Peterson incorporated Anchorage Gas & Oil Development in March 1954. They leased 86,000 acres and drilled about 40 miles north of Anchorage, Alaska.

To raise more capital, in 1955 Tucker and Peterson offered 450,000 “non-assessable” common voting shares of Anchorage Gas & Development Company Inc. at $1.50 a share.

A book about the history of Alaska’s petroleum industry Crude Dreams: A personal History of Oil & Politics in Alaska, by Jack Roderick, includes a few pages and pictures about these two independent oilmen and the tenacious efforts of before “their money and luck had run out.”

The 1969 book “wonderfully evokes the exciting and colorful history of the oil industry in Alaska,” notes the Oil & Gas Journal.

Anglo-American Oil Company

Arkansas Oil Ventures

In 1952, Arkansas Oil Ventures incorporated in Delaware and issued 1,999,000 shares of stock. The Company drilled the Doggett No. 1 well in Jackson County, Arkansas. It was not a producer.

Arkansas Oil Ventures was out of the oil business by 1961 but recapitalized as Trojan Industries in 1969, exchanging each share of Arkansas Oil Ventures common stock (one-cent par value) for one share of Trojan Industries common stock (.05 cent par value). Trojan Industries changed its name to Leisure Trends Incorporated in May of 1970. The company’s charter was cancelled March 1, 1978.

Black Hills Petroleum Company

There are almost daily newspaper accounts of the Black Hills Petroleum Company’s drilling efforts in Custer County, South Dakota between 1929 and 1931.

The state’s Department of Environment & Natural Resources has the documents – but researchers will have to drill deep to locate record numbers (4003305220, 4003305011).

Although the the company found some success in South Dakota oilfields, the value of it’s production did not live up to hype.

“First Flow Commercial Oil in State,” declared a December 20, 1929, headline in the Hot Springs Star, adding that the well was brought in by “Black Hills Pete’s (Petroleum) Company, generating great excitement in the Barker Dome area.”

The anticipated success and commercial oil production did not continue.

Buck Run Oil and Refining Company

Buffalo-Texas Oil Company

California Oil & Gas Company

Capitol Petroleum Company

Similar to promotions used in Denver and elsewhere, a 1919 half-page advertisement in the New York Herald solicited Capitol Petroleum Company investors with the admonition, “We Advise You To Buy Now At $1.00 Per Share – All Cash or Four Equal Payments.”

Advertisements included grainy black and white images of a gusher from “shooting” of the Capitol Petroleum Well No. 36, Mid-Continent Field. Chairman George Fruth noted the company’s successes in Texas, as well as a “luxurious flow of oil…from our Mexican Well” near Tampico, Mexico – the “World’s Richest Oil Field.”

Today, non-cancelled Capitol Petroleum Company stock certificates are offered to collectors online for between $30 and $60 dollars.

Cauble Oil Company

Centralized Oil & Gas Company

The Centralized Oil & Gas Company operated in Gotebo, Kiowa County, Oklahoma, and was still in business as late as 1922, when it appeared in the American Oil Directory along with Fair Play Oil & Gas Company and Gotebo Oil & Refining Company.

Like many other oil regions at the time, entrepreneurs who could quickly secure leases on properties proximate to producing fields improved their chances of drilling a successful well.

The Oklahoma Corporate Commission has no record of a successful well drilled by the Centralized Oil & Gas Company.  Note that the same oilfield vignette is used in certificates issued by the Double Standard Oil & Gas Company, the Evangeline Oil Company and the Buffalo-Texas Oil Company…among others.

Chieftain Royalties, Inc.

Chieftain Royalties incorporated in Delaware in 1928 and conducted business in Oklahoma and Ohio. Although it paid some dividends during a brief lifespan, the company lost its charters to do business in either state by 1931.

In Ohio, the Sandusky Star-Journal reported the arrest of a Chieftain Royalties salesman for violation of the state’s “Blue Sky Laws.” His offense was “making false statements about the earnings of the company he represented.” The following day his 16-cylinder luxury automobile was seized by county authorities.

In the years leading up to the Depression, many investors were duped by highly speculative and/or fraudulent but highly promoted stock investment schemes. State-by-state Blue Sky laws began with Kansas in 1911 to curb “speculative schemes which have no more basis than so many feet of blue sky.”

Supreme Court Justice McKenna used the phrase to characterize “speculative schemes which have no more basis than so many feet of ‘blue sky’.”

Blue sky laws developed in the frenzied years leading up to the Great Depression, in response to fact that more and more ordinary investors were losing money in highly speculative or fraudulent schemes promising high investment returns, such as oilfields and exotic investments in foreign countries.

The federal government intervened with the Securities Act of 1933. Many queries in this blog illustrate the chaotic state of the securities market prior to the Great Depression and the contemporary frenzy to invest quickly before the perceived opportunity was lost. It appears that Chieftain Royalties Corporation was such a speculative but energetically promoted venture that failed.

Cities Service Company

Conejo Hills Oil

Congressional Oil Corporation

Congressional Oil Corporation formed April 10, 1920, with Bernard H. Taylor as President and offices in the First National Bank Building in Wichita Falls, Texas.

By 1922, the American Oil Directory reported that the company had a total daily production of 250 barrels of oil from six wells and the Encyclopedia of Texas noted, “The Congressional Oil Corporation has been very successful in its operations and has over 7,000 acres of leases distributed in various sections of Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico and Mississippi. It has some valuable holding in the Northwest Extension of the Burkburnett field and production in blocks 88 and 96.”

The Nevada State Library and Archives has information on the company. Congressional Oil Corporation stock certificates sell on eBay for about $20.

Corpus-Burk Oil Company

Craven Oil & Refining Company

Double Standard Oil & Gas Company

Doughboy Oil Company

Dysart Oil Company

Eureka Oil Company

In April 1926, the Eureka Oil Company (Eureka, CA – F. W. Johnson, President) drilled the No. 1 Duff well in Humboldt County, California, but abandoned it by 1930. The well was abandoned after failing with both cable tool and rotary drilling efforts, as well as an unsuccessful “shooting” attempt. North Counties Oil Company took over the well, although the abandoned rig and casing were mortgaged and president F. W. Johnson’s “whereabouts were unknown.”

Evangeline Oil Company

Federal Oil and Gas Company

Federal Oil and Gas Company was a West Virginia exploration and production company with offices in Akron, Ohio.

It reported property valuation of $5,000 in the 1917 Annual Report to the Tax Commission of Ohio (Athens County). It was still active in 1919, purchasing 80 acres in Wayne County for $180,000. A separate Federal Oil and Gas Company organized in January 1908 under a Delaware charter.

Beginning with a 4,000-acre lease near Nowata, Oklahoma, with 105 producing wells, this Federal Oil and Gas Company added properties from the Osage Indian Reservation and other companies. By 1911, the company held 12,000 acres with 217 producing oil and natural gas wells.

The 1919 National Gas Association of America’s 14th meeting lists Federal Oil and Gas Company as located at 517 Second National Bank Building in Akron with E. B. Gill as Treasurer and General Manager. E. B. Gill’s signature appears on your certificate.

Fort Stockton Oil Company

Beginning in the 1970s, the Fort Stockton Oil Company experienced a series of name changes, mergers, and acquisitions – which ultimately led to today’s Chevron:

Fort Stockton Oil Company name changed to Western Crude Oil Inc., July 7, 1971;

Western Crude Oil Inc., merged into Reserve Oil & Gas Co., April 17, 1973;

Reserve Oil & Gas Co. merged into Getty Oil Co., January 1980;

Part of Getty Oil Co. merged into Texaco, 1984; Chevron and Texaco merged into ChevronTexaco, 2001; and ChevronTexaco name changed to Chevron in May 2005.

Galloway Oil Corporation

Gas, Oil and Developing Company (The)

Gladys City Oil, Gas & Manufacturing Company

Gladys Oil Company

Golden Gate Oil Company

There have been many Golden Gate Oil companies. A 1921 iteration was founded by John Flynn, Robert Tarrants and others. It was capitalized at $250,000. There also is a 1902 Golden Gate Oil and Refining Company incorporated in South Dakota that seems to have disappeared, as well as a Golden Gate Oil Company incorporated in San Francisco in 1900, capitalized at $500,000 and also apparently defunct. Yet another Golden Gate Oil operated in Oklahoma’s Healdton oilfield in 1916 and brought in at least one dry hole and three 25-barrel a day producers.)

The 1921 Golden Gate Oil Company founded by Flynn and Tarrants brought in three producers in the Los Angeles oilfield between 1922 and 1923. The California Department of Conservation website offers a map that shows where these wells were drilled, but does not include the fate of the company. For most such elusive oil companies – which raised capital by issuing stock to fund drilling for oil – survival depended upon discovering commercial quantities of petroleum before running out of money in the high-risk gamble of exploration. A downturn in the price of oil could also spell disaster. Most oil companies failed and most stocks retain only collectible value which can be found on eBay, Scripophily, and other sites.

Golden Goose Oil and Refining Company

Golden Valley Oil & Gas Company

Golden Valley Oil & Gas Company was formed in Great Falls, Montana February 22, 1921, and capitalized at $100,000. Its president was geologist Gordon Campbell with V. G. Kirkpatrick as an officer of the company.

Campbell was a pioneer in Montana’s early oil industry and developed the Kevin-Sunburst oilfield after his wildcat well found oil on April 14, 1922. It was a 20-barrel a day producer near the town of Shelby and opened an oilfield stretching from Shelby to the Canadian border.

Golden Valley Oil & Gas Company was just one of many oil ventures in which Campbell participated, e.g.; Gordon Campbell Petroleum Co., Campbell Oil Co., etc.

Although convicted in 1922 of a stock promotion scheme, Campbell was still active in 1933 when his Golden Valley Oil & Gas Company drilled in the Belmont Dome area of Golden Valley County. The wildcat venture was promoted, offering stock at $1 per share.

“Our well is showing up exceptionally good. We had a showing of dark green high gravity oil at 520 feet, and have now encountered a better showing at 1150 feet,” one advertisement claimed. But the well was lost to stuck tools at 3,608 feet. Golden Valley Oil & Gas Company faded away.

Great Southwestern Petroleum Company

Great Southwestern Petroleum Company of Oklahoma City was incorporated in August 1917 by Samuel Gordon, Harry Gorden, and Mark Miller with capital of $250,000.

James Butler was President of the company. In Carter County, home to the Hewitt oilfield (second largest in Oklahoma at the time), the company drilled in the field’s southeast extension. This 1921 well was named the Great Southwestern Miller-Jones No. 1 and was on the Gooding farm, but results are unknown.

The Hewitt field developed rapidly during the early 1920s and was east of Oklahoma’s giant Healdton Field. By 1927 the Hewitt oilfield covered 3,050 acres, with more than 800 wells that had produced in excess of 60 million barrels of oil. Nonetheless, Great Southwestern Petroleum Company does not appear to have succeeded as it disappears from references thereafter.

Great Western Oil & Gas Company

Hale Petroleum Company

This Hale Petroleum Company from 1917 is not related to today’s Hale Petroleum Company of Columbus, Kansas. It also has no relation to the Standard Oil-affiliated Frank Hale Oil Company in Louisiana.

In a 1918 text published by the Kansas City Testing Laboratory, Hale Petroleum is identified as having a refinery in Wichita, Kansas, and pipelines to Wichita from nearby El Dorado – site of Butler Country’s Kansas Oil Museum.

Interestingly, a Hale Petroleum is identified as part of Sterling Oil & Refining Company. Sterling Oil was created by Ross Shaw Sterling, the founder and president of the Humble Oil and Refining Company, which eventually became the Exxon, now ExxonMobil.

In the 1920s, he sold his interests in Humble, although he served as president of Sterling Oil & Refining Company until 1946.

Higgins Wonder Oil Company 

Hiram Wilson Oil Company

Hiram Wilson Oil Company worked the Bristow, Oklahoma oil field boom in the mid-1920s. Bristow’s population doubled from 1,667 in the 1910 Census to 3,460 in 1920. The city had three refineries and four pipeline companies in operation in 1930.

Today, Bristow remains a major economic center for central Creek County. Hiram Wilson Oil Company successfully found oil in the field in 1922, and in 1923 was building a “plant” in the field. Another record reports that in 1926, a Hiram Wilson Oil Company well produced 35 barrels a day of crude oil after being “shot” with 10 quarts of nitroglycerin.

Hoffman Oil and Refining Corporation

Holly Oil Company

Horseshoe-Western Oil Company

Iowa-Beaumont Oil Company

Just six months after the famous Spindletop gusher changed American oil history, Iowa-Beaumont Oil Company formed in Beaumont, Texas on June 28, 1901, with capital stock of $500,000. The company’s board of directors were all from Iowa: L. W. Anderson, L. A. Brewer, and H. D. Cone – of Cedar Rapids; J. E. Fox and F. W. Brown – of Belle Plain; P. C. Dings of La Porte City; E. E. Taylor of Traer; and William E. Brice of Mason City.

Brice was a wealthy railroad man and financier who became involved in a number of oil ventures and speculations. In October, the Waterloo (Iowa) Daily Courier reported the Iowa-Beaumont Oil Company to have drilled four gushers and to be “a rich concern owning 550 acres of land, much of it in the ‘proven district’ of Beaumont.”

Brice also formed the Star Petroleum Company in 1902. Star Petroleum turned out to an obscure amalgamation of ten smaller oil companies. Within a year, the Boston Evening Transcript reported allegations that blasted Star Petroleum and Brice.

“These companies sold stock as fast as possible and only as much of the proceeds was used as was required to float the companies, the remainder going into the coffers of the promoters,” proclaimed the newspaper. By July 2, 1906, the Texas secretary of state declared Iowa-Beaumont Oil Company’s right to do business in Texas forfeited. Today, Iowa-Beaumont Company stock certificates occasionally appear online for sale to collectors.

Julian Petroleum Corporation

Julian-Petroleum-Corp-stock-AOGHSIn May 1923, a Canadian named C. C. (Courtney Chauncey) Julian formed the Julian Petroleum Corporation in Los Angeles.

In a Ponzi scheme promoted as an oil investment opportunity, Julian bilked millions of dollars from investors through a continuous newspaper advertising blitz. It became known as the “Julian Pete Scandal” and by April 1927 had peddled almost four million worthless stock certificates. Much has been written about the Julian Petroleum Company and the swindle that rocked Los Angeles.

“In Los Angeles in the early years of the Great Depression, C. C. Julian and the Julian Petroleum Corporation were household words,” notes the 1994 book, The Great Los Angeles Swindle. “They symbolized, not merely what President Franklin D. Roosevelt would later deplore as ‘a decade of debauchery of group selfishness,’ but the failed hopes and dreams of the great boom of the 1920s,” explains writer Jules Tygiel.

“Indeed, no single story captures the essence of the 1920s in America – its booster optimism and rampant speculation, its entrepreneurial mania for mergers, its overlap of business and politics, its application of new communications technology, and its cast of oilmen, stock promoters, Hollywood stars, cinema moguls, banking executives, Prohibition era gangsters, and evangelists – quite so well as the Julian Petroleum swindle.”

Kokernot Oil Company

Lewis Oil Corporation

Lewis-oil-corp-stock-aoghsLewis Oil Corporation was organized by Sheridan C. Lewis, a Dallas lawyer, in March of 1921. Two years later, Lewis’ company represented itself as a large-scale petroleum operation with production, refining, and sales of petroleum products.

Lewis Oil 1923 financial statements reported net assets of more than $6.6 million – but by 1925 company President S. C. Lewis was facing a federal indictment on charges of stock manipulation. Lewis Oil was a “shell” used to take over other companies.

Lewis had oversold the company’s Gold Notes bond issue by 69 percent and printed $100,000 worth of unauthorized notes for himself. Undeterred, Lewis bought Julian Petroleum Company (Julian Pete) from C. C. (Courtney Chauncey) Julian for $500,000. C. C. Julian was also facing a federal indictment on similar charges, but while the wheels of justice turned, Julian Petroleum and Lewis Oil over-issued stock and used an elaborate Ponzi scheme.

By April, 1927, Lewis Oil was deep into litigation that ultimately led to indictments, convictions, and prison sentences for president S. C. Lewis and others. In 1934, C. C. Julian’s suicide was reported: “Penniless at death and a fugitive from justice in the United States, C. C Julian, one-time millionaire oil operator of Oklahoma and California who took poison early today in a fashionable Shanghai hotel, is to be buried by his friends.” S. C. Lewis got out of prison on February 24, 1935. Your stock has collectible value. ALso see the 1994 book The Great Los Angeles Swindle by Jules Tygiel.

Lincoln-Idaho Oil Company

Lincoln Oil Producing Company

Kentuckians J. C. McCombs and H. A. Moore incorporated McCombs Oil Company in Delaware on September 7, 1917. It was soon renamed McCombs Producing & Refining Company and then Lincoln Oil Producing Company. Capitalization was 5,000,000 shares at $1 par value.

By 1919, dissatisfied minority shareholders brought successful suit against the “corporation and those in control of it” to cancel more than 680,000 shares of stock “for fraud.” By 1921 and after extensive litigation, Lincoln Oil Producing Company was in receivership. The company attempted to recover in court and brought suit in 1925 but did not succeed despite multiple appeals.

Finally in 1929, the court’s ruling noted, “of those primarily liable, if liability existed, some were dead, some were gone from Kentucky, and some insolvent.” Lincoln Oil Producing Company stock certificates have collectible value only.

Lucky Jim Oil Company

Lucky Long Oil Company

The Lucky Long Oil Company was organized on January 4, 1918, with capitalization of $50,000 divided into 5,000,000 shares of stock at one cent par value. Promoters received 1,250,000 shares with the balance held in the treasury while stock sales commissions of 25 percent were paid mostly to the company’s officers. As reported in Denver’s June 1918 Municipal Facts publication, the Lucky Long Oil Company was specifically named in a”Blue Sky” investigation whose objective was to “Warn Investors Against Fake Stocks.”

The investigation revealed Lucky Long Oil Company had lured potential investors with spurious “guaranteed 24 percent dividends per year” and sold stock before acquiring any leases. Lucky Long Oil Company was assessed to have “not even a long chance speculative value” and blasted for using “clearly untruthful and misleading” advertising. The company’s president, A. J. Long absconded to Wyoming with $1,600 and Lucky Long Oil Company disappeared.

McKeesport Gas Company

Midfields Oil Company

Mid-Texas Petroleum Company

In late 1921, Mid-Texas Petroleum Company drilled the E.L. Baldwin No. 1 well, which was reported to be “good for 1,000 barrels of oil and 8,000,000 feet of gas” south of Eliasville, Texas.

The company’s Graham No. 1 well was also a producer. In a declining quarter for the oilfield, two of the company’s wells in Young County nonetheless produced more than 6,000 barrels of oil. The company was successful to incentivize investors and on December 5, 1922, Mid-Texas Petroleum Co. and its producing properties in Young County became part of the Seaboard Oil and Gas Company.

Milwaukee Electra Oil Company

In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on August 20, 1918, a group of investors with properties near Electra, Texas, met and formed the Milwaukee Electra Oil Development Company.

Wisconsin granted a charter and within a week, the Electra Texas Oil Lands Company promoted the new company.

“The regular sales meeting will be held at 8:15 Monday night at our office, at which the plan will be explained and the territory described by visitors from the field,” the new company advertised. “The price raise will also be announced. Better attend this meeting.”

Milwaukee Electra Oil Development Company did not last.

Montrose Gas, Oil and Coal Company 

Mountain States Resources Corporation

Mountain-States-Resources-stock-aoghsMountain States Resources Corporation was incorporated in Utah on April 15, 1969, for the purpose of mining and mineral extraction as well as oil and gas exploration, development, and production. The company drilled for oil in Emery and San Juan Counties and conducted mineral prospecting for several years.

According to the Securities and Exchange Commission, the company discontinued operations in 1993 and by June 30, 1995, listed assets of only $440 with liabilities of $934,444. In a September 29, 1997 reverse merger with recapitalization and reorganization, Mountain States Resources – with neither assets nor operations (a shell company) – became Micro-Media Solutions, Inc.

Micro-Media Solutions went public in 1998 as a technology corporation “formed to provide computer hardware and peripherals, internet services, service and support, maintenance, installation services, network systems integration, LAN/WAN distribution services and related turnkey services to the public and private sectors.” Obsolete Mountain States Resources Corporation stock certificates have nominal collectible value.

National Oil Refining and Manufacturing Company

National-Oil-Refining-and-Manufacturing-stock-AOGHSCalifornia entrepreneur George Calhoun organized the National Oil Refining and Manufacturing Company in 1901 with capitalization of $1 million.

Calhoun’s company was to refine oil into gasoline, kerosene and a variety of lubricating oils, as well as “road oil” and asphalt. (All products of growing importance as Americans began buying automobiles. Read the articles “Cantankerous Combustion” and “Asphalt Paves the Way” on this website.) Newspaper ads promoted stock sales, proclaiming “Fortunes in Asphaltum” and that each 10-cent share of stock, “will positively advance to 15-cents per share.”

After building a refinery in Bakersfield in 1904, the company manufactured Black Eagle asphalt and lubricating oils branded as Golden State, Pioneer, and Superior. The plant had the capacity to produce 1,200 tons of asphalt monthly, but securing enough oil to refine became problematic and led to extended contract litigation. George Calhoun died in August 1920. His company left few records. Scripophily collectors may value such obsolete certificates.

National Union Oil & Gas Company

New Mexico Oil Properties Association

North Counties Oil Company

Oil Exploration International

Oil Exploration International has quite a convoluted history. Sometime after its 1965 incorporation in Delaware, Oil Exploration International, Inc. became one of many subsidiaries of “Adatom.” Over a period of years, Adatom acquired dozens of subsidiaries.

Adatom was taken to Federal Court by the Securities Exchange Commission in 2009. SEC charged that Adatom’s subsidiaries “were typically shell companies with no assets or business operations” and that Adatom “used the spinoffs to create a trading market in the stocks of the Subsidiaries without providing the public disclosure that registration requires.”

Adatom had ceased operations in 2001 but was maintained as a corporate shell. The company moved its incorporation from Delaware to Oregon (2002), then to Ontario, Canada (2003) changing its name to First Canadian American Holding Corporation (FCAR.) The company again moved its incorporation to Wyoming (2004) and changed its name to Blackout Media Corporation in 2006. Oil Exploration International, Inc. was recorded to have no assets or liabilities.

Old Colony Oil Company 

Overland Oil Incorporated

Overland Oil, Inc., of Denver, Colorado, was established with Winfield Morton as president, followed by Elmer F.E. Schmidt and John O. Hayden. Board members included Andrew T. Sweet (formerly of the U.S. Bureau of Mines).

In June 1953, in order to raise capital for “general corporation purposes,” the company offered 600,000 new common stock shares to current stockholders for 40-cents per share on a l-for-2 basis. In December, the company offered an additional 300,000 shares to the public for 20-cents per share.

By 1955, the company was involved in a process for extracting uranium from ore, but was declared defunct on October 10, 1962, for nonpayment of taxes.

Palmer Union Oil Company

Pelican Petroleum Company

Despite much investment by companies such as Continental, Shell, Texas Company and a host of start-up ventures, the state of Washington’s first and only commercial producer, Sunshine Mining Company’s Medina No. 1, near Ocean City in Gray Harbor County, did not come in until 1957. It produced 223 barrels a day from a depth of 4,135 feet near Ocean City in Gray Harbor County.

In 1938, with partner Peoples Gas & Oil Development Company, the Pelican Petroleum Company drilled the Pelican Dome No. 1 well to 5,500 feet in Whatcom County with no success. Although Pelican soon disappeared from the records, collectors value these old certificates at about $70.

About 600 oil and natural gas wells have been drilled in Washington through 2010, according to Washington’s commissioner of public lands. “But large-scale commercial production has never occurred. The most recent production, which was from the Ocean City Gas and Oil Field west of Hoquiam, ceased in 1962, and no oil or gas have been produced since that time.”

Petroleum Maatschappij Salt Creek Company

Petroleum Producers’ Association

Petroleum Production Company of America

A February 25, 1918, reference announces that R. B. (Robert Bradford) Marshall of East St. Louis, Illinois; Anna Thurstrup of Chicago, and Marion Luce, of Oak Park, Illinois, had applied to incorporate the Petroleum Production Company of America in Delaware with the purpose of acquiring and developing petroleum properties. Capitalization was only $500,000. That company soon disappears – which is not uncommon for the highly speculative business of finding oil with an undercapitalized venture.

The company’s founders included Marion Luce who was a Chicago socialite and a principal investor in a number of companies of the era: 1916 – The United Battery Company (capital stock of $3 million); 1917 – Aristo Company of America (manufacturer of wall and interior decorations capitalized at $1 million); 1918 – The Ideal Laboratories Company (manufacturer of “Lura Toilet Preparations” capitalized at $2 million); and in 1921- Utility Battery Company of America, capitalized at $5 million.

Another of the Petroleum Company of America’s founders was Robert Bradford Marshall who after graduating in 1888 from Columbian (now George Washington) University joined the United States Geological Survey and became its Chief Geographer by 1918. Despite what seems to be adequately funded and qualified founders, the Petroleum Production Company of America does not appear to have prospered, nor do any of Marion Luce’s investments.

Phenix Oil & Gas Company

The Phenix Oil & Gas Company was incorporated in Cheyenne, Wyoming, Laramie County on January 29, 1902.

The business operated from Cheyenne with a nine-member board of directors: A. Entwistle; Nicholas Herival (President); George Williams; J. A. Teagarden; C. B. Frantz; J. A. Naylor; E. N. Cook; C. L. Stewart; and J. A. Gillfillan.

An earlier Phenix Oil Company was formed in Oklahoma by Edwin Foster – and the historic Indian Territory Illuminating Oil Company – later the Cities Service Oil Company.

During the turbulent year of Phenix Oil & Gas Company’s incorporation, the New York Times reported Wyoming’s oil excitement – and the entrepreneurs who quickly secured leases on properties anywhere near producing fields to improve their chances of drilling a successful well. Many drilled dry holes. It does not appear that Phenix Oil & Gas Company survived.

Pongratz Petroleum Company

If the stock certificate for the Pongratz Petroleum Company names Gus Pongratz as an officer of the company, it is likely the same individual previously associated with a failed California Independent Oil Organization.

On February 24, 1934, “California Independent Oil Organization” leased 560 acres in Crow Indian tribal land in Big Horn County, Montana. Gus Pongratz operated the lease until operations ceased in April, 1936. California Department of Conservation (Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources) maps show the Pongratz Petroleum

Company as once having several wells in Los Angeles with Newmark No. 1, Newmark No. 2, Martin No. 1, Dutch No. 1, and Schelnik No. 1 marked “plugged and abandoned.” The Gus Pongratz Dorsey 1-A is marked “plugged and abandoned-dry hole.”

Postal Employees Oil & Gas Company

Short-lived 1921 newspaper stock solicitations in New York state urged investors to “Get in on the Ground Floor by purchasing Postal Employees Oil & Gas Company stock, declaring that company owned“ 135 acres in fee simple and over 5,200 acres of valuable leases.

”One advertisement included annotated maps of Texas to show Postal Employees Oil & Gas Company properties located near famous oil fields like Ranger and Burkburnett as well as the Caddo field in Louisiana. Further inducements to invest note that the Postal employees Oil & Gas Co. of Texarkana, Texas, is the only oil company in the world operated and controlled by men in the employment of the U. S. Government. This fact alone is a guarantee of a square deal.”

It does not appear that Postal Employees Oil & Gas was able to raise sufficient funding to drill any wells, but the Texas Railroad Commission may be able to help you with further research.

Price River Petroleum Company

Producers and Refiners Corporation

Consolidated Oil Company (Sinclair) acquired Kansas’ Prairie Pipe Line Company in 1932, and with it, about $13 million in debt and loan guarantees that Prairie Pipe Line had committed to Producers and Refiners Corporation.

Producers and Refiners Corporation (PARCO) went into receivership within a month of the acquisition. Sinclair bought the bankrupt company’s assets at auction in 1934. Because PARCO went bankrupt – along with many other oil companies when oil prices plummeted and the Depression arrived – Sinclair had to pay the debts.

Common stock shareholders of PARCO were left with worthless securities. Today these have only collectible value. The Wyoming town of Sinclair (formerly known as Parco) has a community museum with exhibits about the region’s history.

Provident Oil & Refining Company

In March 1921, a majority interest in the Provident Oil & Refining Company of Houston was acquired by the Chappell Oil Company of Wyoming. Provident Oil & Refining had been active with a test well in Eastland County, Texas, and planned further drilling operations in the Toyah Shallow field and Pecos Valley Territory.

Provident Oil had also searched for oil in central Montana (Cat Creek anticline) and Wyoming’s Salt Creek field. In 1922, the Mutual Oil Company of Denver, Colorado acquired controlling interest in the Chappell Oil Company and its two wells in Salt Creek that were producing 6,300 barrels of crude oil daily.

Prudential Oil and Refining Company

Quick Development Syndicate

In Houston, Texas, Quick Development Syndicate was incorporated in 1923 by C. C. Cannon, J. C. Gibson, and others. Capitalization was $110,000. By March, the company issued more stock to increase capitalization to $170,000 and had a brief showing of oil from its wildcat well in Brazoria County, but the well was not productive and abandoned.

In December 1924, the Texas district court in Seguin ruled on a Texas Railroad Commission suit against Quick Development Syndicate for violation of Rule 37, which “requires oil well drillers to secure permission from the commission before sinking a well within the prescribed 150 feet.”

The court issued a permanent injunction against Quick Development Syndicate and imposed a fine. The company disappears after the ruling.

Ranger Petroleum Company

Revere Oil Company

Richfield Oil Corporation

Ruby Hill Oil & Gas Company

Ruby Hill Oil & Gas Company stock was promoted at 5 cents per share in 1930 and the company drilled near Denver, Colorado, in 1934. Its No. 1 Braden well in Jefferson County, stalled for a year – then resumed making hole in 1935. The company apparently failed, as its stock certificates are valued only by collectors for their artistic and historic value.

Ryan Petroleum Corporation

When Ryan Petroleum Corporation was created on April 26, of 1919, in Maine, its assets included 60 percent ownership of the Morton Petroleum Company whose president, A. D. Morton, became president of both companies. Chairman of the Ryan Petroleum Board of Directors was a well-known Wall Street tycoon named Allan A. Ryan. He was the majority owner and on the Boards of several companies including Continental Candy Co., Republic Match Co., the American Tobacco Company, and Stromberg Carburetor among others.

The newly formed Ryan Petroleum Corporation controlled about 41,000 lease acres in Texas’ Ranger oil district as well as small leases in the very productive Burkburnett oil field plus 40 wells in Kansas. A contemporary report nonetheless noted, “The Ryan shares are a speculation, of course, and the company is so new that no earnings figures are available. The wild scramble for oil shares, which is a feature of the curb trading, should benefit Ryan still further, if nothing else.”

The company had drilling operations in Texas, Kansas, and Oklahoma and brought in several producers, but overproduction drove prices down and costs went up. In 1920, both Ryan Petroleum Corporation and Morton Petroleum stock certificates were replaced on the basis of a ten-for-one exchange with Ryan Consolidated Petroleum Corporation stock, incorporated in Delaware.

Also in 1920, Chairman of the Ryan Petroleum Corp. Board of Directors Allan A. Ryan was expelled from his seat on the New York Stock Exchange because of his scandalous “curb the market” takeover of the Stutz Motor Car Company that was subsequently adjudged, “conduct inconsistent with just and equitable principles of trade.” (Stutz Motor Car Co. of Indianapolis manufactured the famed “Stutz Bearcat” automobile.)

The one-time Wall Street wunderkind’s fortunes promptly deteriorated and he declared personal bankruptcy in 1922 with debts of more than $32 million. Ryan Consolidated Petroleum Corporation was sold by the Guaranty Trust Bank to a group of private investors (including A. D. Morton) and ultimately merged with Morton Petroleum Company in 1926.

Sable Oil & Gas Company

Sable Oil & Gas Company is recorded as having drilled three wells approximately one mile distant from Torrent, Kentucky:

February 2, 1920 – a dry hole to a total depth of 1,107 feet; February 27, 1920 – a productive well completed and “shot” at a total depth of 1,132 feet; and June 1, 1920 – another dry hole completed at 1,105 feet. The company no longer exists, but was founded October 25, 1919, with 200,000 shares of stock issued. The Wolfe County Clerk’s Office may be able to provide further information.

Sammies Oil Corporation (Choate Oil)

Sammies Oil Corporation was incorporated in Delaware in August of 1917. In October 1919, the company changed its name to Choate Oil Corporation. At that time, it was capitalized at $5 million, with 500,000 shares (no par value) and no dividends paid.

Choate owned a 2,000 barrel a day refinery in Oklahoma City, interests in a Burkburnett oilfield pipeline, storage facilities, and more than 150 tank cars. It also owned a gas company in Ranger, Texas, as well as the Sammies Oil & Supply Company, which distributed petroleum products in Iowa and South Dakota.

Despite these assets and a producing lease in Louisiana’s Caddo oilfield, by November 27, 1922, Choate Oil Corporation was bankrupt and the company’s entire holdings were sold at auction in Oklahoma City with bids continued to January 17, 1923.

Santa Fe Dome Oil Company

Sawyer Petroleum Company

Sawyer Petroleum Company was formed by Ernest Walker Sawyer, former assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Interior.

The company was active in Beaverhead County, Montana in the 1960s and partnered with the Union Pacific Railroad Company in pursuit of rare-earth minerals (radioactive thorite) in the Lemhi Pass district. The company’s name changed to Sawyer-Adecor International, Inc. in the 1970s and in March 1997, the company was renamed again as Oil Retrieval Systems, Inc.

The newly named company was ostensibly in the business of manufacturing and distributing portable swabbing units to the oil and natural gas industry. The Securities and Exchange Commission records Oil Retrieval Systems, Inc. as a dissolved Arizona corporation, having not filed any required periodic reports since 1996. Sawyer Petroleum Company stock certificates sell on EBay for about $10.

Sawyer-Adecor International

Seaboard Oil & Gas Company

Security Oil Company

Security Oil Company was one of the 37 corporate defendants charged in the famous “Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, et. al., v. The United States” which was decided May 15, 1911 – and resulted in the breakup of Standard Oil due to violations of anti-trust legislation.

The court noted, “The combination of the defendants in this case is an unreasonable and undue restraint of trade in petroleum and its products moving in interstate commerce.” The court mandated breakup of Standard Oil subsidiaries led to the Magnolia Petroleum Company of Texas taking over Security Oil Company properties in 1911.

Shoshone Oil Company

Signal Oil and Gas Company

Signal Oil and Gas Company originated in 1928. By 1968, Signal Oil and Gas had become a diverse conglomerate and was renamed The Signal.

In 1985, Allied Chemical & Dye and The Signal companies merged to form Allied-Signal Incorporated. A year later, Allied-Signal spun off about 35 of its diverse subsidiary operations into a new and separate company that was renamed AlliedSignal in 1993.

AlliedSignal bought Honeywell International in 1999 but dropped the AlliedSignal name, becoming today’s Honeywell International.

Sound Cities Gas & Oil Company

Southwest Oil Corporation

Southwest Oil Corporation was more into the music business than into oil. The company drilled two dry holes near Portland in Sumner County, Kansas between October 1955 and January 1956. No oil was found and by February, the wells were abandoned.

It appears that the company abandoned the oil business as well because on May 8, 1961, Southwest Oil became a wholly owned subsidiary of Melo-Sonics, which had been established as a Delaware corporation in 1953 and was involved in distribution of background music, tape repeaters and related items. Southwest Oil Corporation was renamed Melo-Sonics and subsequently joined with Whippany Electronics Inc., in the manufacture of portable electronic organs popular with rock bands.

Vintage Whippany and Melo-Sonic equipment can be seen online but by 1996, the trademark had expired and the company dissolved. In 2003, about 32,000 obsolete Melo-Sonics Non-Transferable Securities Certificates were authorized for destruction by the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation.

Southwestern Oil Development Company

Spear Oil Company

Staveless Barrel & Tank Company

Tapo Oil Company

Tapo Oil Company was formed in April 27, 1900, with capital of $500,000. President was S. C. Graham and secretary was C. H. McKevett. The company was based in Santa Paula and drilled three shallow dry holes (about 700 feet deep) on Rancho Tapo north of Simi Valley, California, in 1901-1902. California records the wells as abandoned prior to 1913.

Graham was a Pennsylvania-born oilman and had several years experience with the Hardesty & Steweart Oil Company – which would become Union Oil. Graham and McKevett had also founded the Graham-Loftus Oil Company in 1898 and found success in Orange County, California. One Graham-Loftus well is reported to have produced 700 barrels a day. Union Oil Co. was the principle buyer of all the oil produced.

Graham remained active in the oil business after the failure of Tapo Oil Company and served as president of the Grador Oil Company, formed August 16, 1908, capitalized at $250,000 and dissolved in 1922. Graham also served as President of the Placentia Oil Co (formed 1914) and the Gilroy Oil of Los Angeles, which drilled six unsuccessful wells in Santa Clara county.

Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation

Texas Oil & Refining Company

Texas Oil Products Company

Texas Producers Oil Company

In 1918, forty-three miles northwest of Beaumont, Texas in eastern Liberty County, the Hull oilfield was discovered, sparking rapid growth of the town. Under the supervision of a man named “Bud” Cole, the Texas Producers Oil Company drilled two dry holes in the Hull oilfield in 1919-1920.

The early days of the oil business involved frequent scrambles to new oilfields when such a discovery announced the presence of oil. Entrepreneurs, investors, landsmen, and speculators were drawn to the boom but dry holes and bankruptcies were necessarily part of the landscape. The Delaware Department of State’s Division of Corporations reports that Texas Producers Oil Company was formed in September, 1917, but little else.

The Texas Railroad Commission retains Historical Oil and Gas Records (drilling records) and may have information on the Texas Producers Oil Company operations in Texas circa 1920.

Texas Production Company

Texas-Rotan Oil Company

Texas-Rotan Oil Company may have been created to gamble on the success of the much larger Texas Company’s wildcat explorations in Fisher County, Texas. (The Texas Company later became Texaco – now a part of Chevron.) Such a major oil company is capitalized sufficiently to absorb substantial losses if drilling efforts produce only dry holes.

When a major oil company’s geological research prompts them to drill in a previously unproductive area, it is sure to draw entrepreneurs and investors hoping to find successful lease opportunities nearby. In 1918-1919 the Texas Company drilled four dry holes in southwest Fisher County before moving its exploration rigs to the vicinity of Rotan. The Texas Railroad Commission (RRC) maintains maps RRC’s Public GIS Map Viewer that show drilling around Rotan, but neither the Texas Company nor the Texas-Rotan Company found oil.

The county’s first commercial oil discovery (the D. W. Stephens No. 1 – drilled by the Texas Company) would not come until 1928, but that well produced for 66 years. The RRC map shows many dry holes and later, many productive wells…but the Texas-Rotan Oil Company does not appear to have shared in that success.

Texas United Oil Company

Tulsa Producing and Refining Company

In February and 1919, the El Paso Herald carried an advertisement for the Tulsa Producing and Refining Company as “A Strong, Solid Company With Two Wells Now Drilling” and offering 250,000 shares of stock at $1 per share.

Both wells were said to be drilling in Comanche County, Texas, where the company held 1,000 acres under lease and which experienced an oil boom that peaked in 1920, with 328,098 barrels of oil produced. More enthusiastic advertisements followed in the Pittsburgh Gazette Times (May and June 1919) which promoted sales by noting:

“If either of these wells come in big, the shareholders of the Tulsa Producing & Refining Company will cash in strong – and do it quickly. You will feel pretty good some of these fine mornings when your shares jump to 5 or 10 for one. We believe this is going to happen – and happen soon, too.”

It apparently didn’t happen, as references to the company disappear thereafter. Note that this certificate’s oilfield vignette  can be found on other certificates.

Union Oil, Gas & Refining Company

Although initially named the Union Oil & Gas Company with capitalization of $3 million, the company changed its name to Union Oil, Gas, & Refining Company and increased its capitalization to $3.5 million by issuing stock.

The company was under control of Mr. J. B, Atkins, president, when the periodical American Investor published a scathing analysis of its operations and described it as “organized primarily for the benefit of the promoters, and that this benefit is derived not only from the receipt of a large part of the capital stock for a small consideration, but also from the payment of excessive salaries…”

Union Oil,Gas & Refining was soon insolvent and in the hands of a receiver.

Wellington Oil Company of Delaware

Wellington Oil Company of Delaware incorporated September 1, 1936, to merge Wellington Oil Company (California) and Santa Clara Oil and Development Company (Texas.) The new company issued 850,000 shares of stock in exchange for the physical assets of the two predecessor companies.

John T. O’Neil and C. W. Atkins were named president and vice president respectively; both were experienced and successful oil men. The Company’s main office was in San Antonio, Texas. In 1942, the Wellington Oil Company of Delaware was sold to Seaboard Oil Company (Delaware) with one share of Seaboard exchanged for every four shares of Wellington. Seaboard Oil Company was in turn absorbed by the Texas Company (later Texaco) in 1958.

Woman’s Federal Oil Company of America

Women’s National Oil & Development Company

Women’s National Oil & Development Company (Womens Oil) was in the time of Wyoming’s big oil boom, which began with No. 1 Salt Creek well in October 1908 that opened Salt Creek as one of the most significant fields in the Rocky Mountains and inspired many entrepreneurs.

The post-World War I surge in demand brought even more exploration, but the Women’s National Oil & Development Company didn’t leave much behind,

Researchers may be able to find additional information through the Wyoming State Archives’ holdings of inactive corporation files from the Wyoming Secretary of State.

Wyoming Peerless Oil Company

Yankee Girl Oil Company

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